Medi(@)Slave - spoilers ahead
#SafetyNotGuaranteed
The film follows an intern at a magazine, when she is sent to a story about an ad in a paper about time travels, she finds herself involved with the guy. As the film goes on she starts little by little to see that the guy believes it to be true that he can time travel, and that he isn’t a ‘nut job’, as the film goes forward, things get in their way, included doubt, but in the end she chooses to believe him and is rewarded.
The films protagonist is a pessimist, having never really lived after herm other died, so when she meets the man, and hears his story, she finds another lost person in the world who understands her. They both bond over their stories of loss, and both want to rectify those problems.
The film starts off innocently, with the woman slowly starting to believe that the man sees some form of truth in his claims, and even gets a bit darker when the conspiracy theories start to seem to come true, but in the end, she believes in what he believes.
The film also reveals that the person that the man wants to save is actually alive, but after the ending, I think that means that what when they went back into the past, that they were able to complete their mission, when the woman goes to the box to see if there’s a note, its not a way of saying ‘it didn’t work’ but a way of saying that the two of them are happy in the past.
The side story of the other man who is looking to rekindle his relationship with his ‘first love’ is also an interesting one, which I think makes the whole story about the past, and how some people live in it, and how some people try to move on from it.  For example the main story is one of the two people living in the past, both figuratively and realistically. They both want to change things in the past and it is what drives them, but once the side story is completely, you see that some people who live in the past, realise that its not all that it is cracked up to be, and that he starts to live for the day, and not look back into the past. 

#SafetyNotGuaranteed

The film follows an intern at a magazine, when she is sent to a story about an ad in a paper about time travels, she finds herself involved with the guy. As the film goes on she starts little by little to see that the guy believes it to be true that he can time travel, and that he isn’t a ‘nut job’, as the film goes forward, things get in their way, included doubt, but in the end she chooses to believe him and is rewarded.

The films protagonist is a pessimist, having never really lived after herm other died, so when she meets the man, and hears his story, she finds another lost person in the world who understands her. They both bond over their stories of loss, and both want to rectify those problems.

The film starts off innocently, with the woman slowly starting to believe that the man sees some form of truth in his claims, and even gets a bit darker when the conspiracy theories start to seem to come true, but in the end, she believes in what he believes.

The film also reveals that the person that the man wants to save is actually alive, but after the ending, I think that means that what when they went back into the past, that they were able to complete their mission, when the woman goes to the box to see if there’s a note, its not a way of saying ‘it didn’t work’ but a way of saying that the two of them are happy in the past.

The side story of the other man who is looking to rekindle his relationship with his ‘first love’ is also an interesting one, which I think makes the whole story about the past, and how some people live in it, and how some people try to move on from it.  For example the main story is one of the two people living in the past, both figuratively and realistically. They both want to change things in the past and it is what drives them, but once the side story is completely, you see that some people who live in the past, realise that its not all that it is cracked up to be, and that he starts to live for the day, and not look back into the past. 

  1. rickyjdiaz posted this